An analysis of shooting an elephant an essay by george orwell

Only he can make the final decision.

Why does george orwell shoot the elephant

While Orwell may theoretically be opposed to his position as a police officer in Burmese society, he is driven to uphold it out of fear of ridicule. The essay "Shooting an Elephant" relates to this situation. At times these interactions might take a favourable turn and be less biter like when the elephant as on rampage. The prisons especially presented rich evidence regarding the wrongdoings of the British. His description of the tortured bodies of prisoners in their cells illustrates in physical terms what he refers to when he speaks of the British Empire's dirty work. Orwell sends an orderly to get an elephant rifle from a friend. At the end he goes on to pour bullets into the elephant just to ensure it is dead. Orwell shows that while he has been feeling like a fool, it is easy to see others are bigger fools who neither know their own conscience and nor understand the feelings of the natives. The author of this essay is George Orwell. The crowd sighed in relief and as he pulled the trigger it cheered. Orwell was very detailed about his feelings about the killing through out the essay. He was not an experienced hunter and did not know where to shoot the animal so aimed for its forehead where he thought its brain was. This experience, a true experience, takes place in British Burma, while he was a part of the Imperial Police. Humiliation is an entirely psychic injury, unlike most other forms of injury. The absence of a dialogue is to emphasize the internal conflict experienced by the narrator

One of the many symbolic elements in this piece is the gun Essay questions: — — What is the main point or theme of the essay? The unjust shooting of an elephant in Orwell's story is the central focus from which Orwell builds his argument through the two dominant characters, the elephant and its executioner.

An analysis of shooting an elephant an essay by george orwell

The fate of the elephant lies in his hands. It is why he cannot afford being hated either. This style helps him deliver the point with the effectiveness he wants. He had broken his chains and escaped into the town and the mahout who could control it had given the wrong way to chase the beast and could not be back for twelve hours. Orwell uses the death of the elephant as another metaphor of British Imperialism in Burma. He communicates in detail how he disagrees with the concept of imperialism but likewise dislikes the taunting Burmese community. It was frequently expressed in their interactions and as Orwell notes if a white lady could dare venture alone into the market, some native would spit betel juice on her. The elephant is equivalent to the British Empire ravaging through Burma and disrupting the little bit of peace that they have. Likewise, he has an internal clash between his moral conscious and his immoral actions. The man had come under the feet of the elephant. Upon reaching the field Orwell writes,? As Orwell made his way to the paddy the crowd behind him grew as they all hoped and assumed he would shoot the elephant. While searching for the animal a villager is trampled to death. The essay presents a powerful theme of inner conflict. The story takes place in British-ruled Burma.

In the end, due to Orwell's decision, the elephant lay dying in a pool of blood. After having completed his education, Orwell joined the Indian Imperial Police, and served in Burma, from toas an Assistant Superintendent of Police.

Shooting an elephant by george orwell pdf

In the essay he writes not just about his personal experience with the elephant but how metaphorical the experience is to Imperialism and his views on the matter. It is to keep the readers focused on the core of the topic which is the moral dilemma and guilt that Orwell personally feels while serving the British empire. Words: , Paragraphs: 8, Pages: 4 Publication date: July 16, Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website! Humiliation is an entirely psychic injury, unlike most other forms of injury. Orwell wins the sympathy of readers by expressing the pressure he feels as an Anglo-Indian in Burma, struggling with his morals, and showing a sense of compassion for the dying animal. This hatred forms part of a general anti-European sentiment in the area at the time. Readers respect Orwell for his sense of duty. It is why he cannot afford being hated either. Orwell 's voice as narrator is the only one readers hear. The Burmans who were eager to have its meat, stripped its bones of all the flesh by afternoon.

Orwell was worried he could hardly do anything but then he decided that he must see. He was a police officer who worked for British imperialists and killing the elephant would help him receive good judgement from the villagers in Burma.

shooting an elephant questions

Symbolism is a heavy orchestrator in this essay, with Orwell relating the concept of imperialism to several events such as the elephant 's rampage, the dead coolie, and the actual shooting of the elephant His burden is much different from that of his compatriots who gladly follow everything that is law.

He is puppet being controlled.

George orwell essays summary

The British officer, the executioner, acts as a symbol of the imperial country, while the elephant symbolizes the victim of imperialism In Orwell 's Shooting an Elephant, he describes this experience with the use of multiple symbolic characters. It is why he cannot afford being hated either. This experience led him to resign and later become an author. It is to keep the readers focused on the core of the topic which is the moral dilemma and guilt that Orwell personally feels while serving the British empire. The unjust shooting of an elephant in Orwell's story is the central focus from which Orwell builds his argument through the two dominant characters, the elephant and its executioner. It is then Orwell claims he realizes the true position of whites in the East and how Imperialism hurts not only the victims but the oppressors. When George Orwell signed up for a five-year position as a British officer in Burma he was unaware of the moral struggle that he was going to face. When he hears of the elephant rampaging through the bazaar, he feels compelled to show his face, and demonstrate his responsibility. He writes of several situations that show his immoral doings. The Buddhist priests, he says, are the worst.
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Orwell's Shooting an elephant: Summary, Analysis & Essay Questions